Postdoctoral Positions in Vaccine Development and Systems Immunology Available Immediately 03/29/2022

Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health (CVD), Immunology Group,
University of Maryland School of Medicine.

We are seeking postdoctoral fellows to work on immunological studies directed at understanding immune responses and uncovering immunological correlates of protection following immunization and infection in humans with the long-term goal of accelerating the development of novel vaccines. Studies will include exploration of the mechanisms operative in the generation of systemic and mucosal immunity in children, young adults and the elderly and their relationship to the gut microbiota. These studies will involve participants immunized with licensed or investigational attenuated and subunit vaccines, as well as volunteers challenged
with wild-type organisms. Studies will involve the use of advanced technologies and instrumentation such as high-parameter flow cytometry and mass cytometry (50+
parameters/cell) with a focus on complex data analyses, as well as the performance of a variety of molecular biology and immunological techniques depending on the research questions being addressed. These include, among others, functional assays (e.g., cell purification, proliferation, cytotoxic T cell activity, Elispot, regulatory T cell activity, identification of T cell epitopes, B cell maturation and function), multiplexed cytokines/chemokines/biomarker determinations, bulk transcriptomics on heterogeneous populations and sorted cell subsets, single cell transcriptomics (scRNA-seq), CITE-seq, scTCR-seq, scBCR-seq, epigenetic landscape determinations, and role of microRNAs (miRNA) in the regulation of immunity.


The CVD is a rich environment involving scientists and physicians working in all phases of vaccine development. The CVD has earned an international reputation for genetically engineering and testing vaccines against a wide variety of enteric and other infections. Based in the School of Medicine at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, the CVD, established in the 70’s, remains one of only a handful of vaccine centers in the world engaged in the full range of vaccinology: from basic science through vaccine development, immunological studies, clinical evaluation and field studies. The CVD offers a nurturing environment that focuses on training and supporting post-doctoral fellows in their path towards independence.


The successful candidate should have a Ph.D. in Microbiology/Immunology and/or M.D. degree, experience in the study of immunological mechanisms, a strong publication track record, be highly motivated, have outstanding organizational skills and great attention to detail, high scientific integrity and rigor, excellent written and oral communication skills and hold a valid VISA to work in the US. A strong background in molecular biology, bioinformatics and systems biology analyses, as well as experience in flow and mass cytometry and other immunological techniques is highly desirable. Post-doctoral fellowships are initially for one year, but they may be renewed annually based on progress and performance for up to a maximum of 5 years.


Please send curriculum vitae, a brief outline of relevant research experience and interests and the names of three references via e-mail to Marcelo B. Sztein M.D., Professor of Pediatrics; Associate Director for Basic and Translational Research, Chief, Cellular Immunology Section, CVD, and Director of the University of Maryland Flow Cytometry and Mass Cytometry Core Facility; at msztein@som.umaryland.edu. Further information about the CVD can be found at: medschool.umaryland.edu/CVD/. The UM is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.

Third Round of Pilot Grant Awardees Announced

The CCHI IOFM Core funded seven applications submitted in response to our RFA released September 2, 2021. The CCHI Steering Committee sought applications from CCHI centers to capitalize on emerging opportunities and encourage multi-center, multi-disciplinary collaborations. The immediate objective of the CCHI is to support mechanistic and hypothesis-testing studies to understand human immunity applicable to the biodefense effort (i.e. innate, adaptive and mucosal immune responses to infection, vaccination and adjuvants). Studies on immune-mediated diseases (e.g. airway allergy, food allergy, autoimmunity, organ transplant rejection) and basic human immunology are also of interest, as these data will provide a more comprehensive understanding of the human immune system.  Special consideration is provided to investigators from groups shown to be underrepresented in the represented in the biomedical workforce (NIH’s Interest in Diversity, NOT-OD-20-031), Early Stage Investigators/New Investigators (ESI/NI, please see NIH Next Generation Research Initiative Policies), and investigators who are relatively new to human immunology research.

Gabriel Victora, PhD, MSc from Rockefeller University applied from the Rockefeller University CCHI U19 Center (Ravetch, PD/PI). Project is entitled “Reactivation and secondary hypermutation of memory B in humans following hepatitis B immunization”

Debattama Sen, PhD from Massachusetts General Hospital; MPI, George Lauer, MD, PhD applied from the Massachusetts General Hospital/University of Pennsylvania CCHI U19 Center (Chung and Wherry, PD/PIs). Project is entitled “Dissecting exhausted CD8+ T cell fate and function using epigenome editing”

Ansuman Satpathy, MD, PhD from Stanford University applied from the Stanford University CCHI U19 Center (Davis, PD/PI). Project is entitled “Massively-parallel single-cell multi-omics to chart human immune cell states in infection”

Anamika Patel, PhD from Emory University applied from the Emory University CCHI U19 Center (Ahmed PD/PI). Project is entitled “Structure-Function study of CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies from Indian population”

Selene Meza-Perez, PhD from the University of Alabama at Birmingham; MPI, Troy Randall, PhD applied from the University of Alabama at Birmingham CCHI U19 Center (Lund, PD/PI) Project is entitled “Role of microbiota-dependent arginine catabolism in tuning mTOR-dependent Treg function”

Sixto Leal, MD, PhD from the University of Alabama at Birmingham applied from the University of Alabama at Birmingham CCHI U19 Center (Lund, PD/PI). Project is entitled “The Impact of SARS-CoV-2 Immune Dysregulation on Antifungal Immunity”

William Hildebrand, PhD, MA from the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center applied from the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation CCHI U19 Center (Coggeshall/Thompson, PD/PI). Project is entitled “HLA Typing Core for CCHI Investigators”

Postdoctoral Positions in Vaccine Development

Job description: Postdoctoral Positions in Vaccine Development. November 18, 2021. Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health (CVD), Immunology Group, University of Maryland School of Medicine. Available immediately. 

The CVD involves scientists and physicians working in all phases of vaccine development. The CVD has earned an international reputation for genetically engineering and testing vaccines against a wide variety of enteric and other infections. Based in the School of Medicine at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, the CVD was established in the 70’s as one of the first facilities to evaluate vaccines in community volunteers. It is one of only a handful of vaccine centers in the world engaged in the full range of vaccinology: from basic science through vaccine development, immunological studies, clinical evaluation, and field studies. 

We are seeking postdoctoral fellows who will participate in immunological studies directed at understanding immune responses and uncovering immunological correlates of protection following immunization and infection in humans with the long-term goal of accelerating the development of novel vaccines. Studies will include exploration of the mechanism’s operative in the generation of systemic and mucosal immunity in children, young adults and the elderly and their relationship to the gut microbiota. These studies will involve participants immunized with licensed or investigational attenuated and subunit vaccines, as well as volunteers challenged with wild-type organisms. Studies will involve the use of advanced technologies and instrumentation such as high-parameter flow cytometry and mass cytometry (48+ parameters/cell) with a focus on complex data analyses, as well as the performance of a variety of molecular biology and immunological techniques depending on the research questions being addressed. These include, among others, functional assays (e.g., cell purification, proliferation, cytotoxic T cell activity, Elispot, regulatory T cell activity, identification of T cell epitopes, B cell maturation and function), multiplexed cytokines/chemokines/biomarker determinations, bulk transcriptomics on heterogeneous populations and sorted cell subsets, single cell transcriptomics (scRNA-seq), CITE-seq, scTCR-seq, scBCR-seq, epigenetic landscape determinations, and role of microRNAs (miRNA) in the regulation of immunity. 

The successful candidate should have a Ph.D. in Microbiology/Immunology and/or M.D. degree, experience in the study of immunological mechanisms, a strong publication track record, be highly motivated, have outstanding organizational skills and great attention to detail, high scientific integrity and rigor, excellent written and oral communication skills and hold a valid VISA to work in the US. A strong background in molecular biology, bioinformatics and systems biology analyses, as well as experience in flow and mass cytometry and other immunological techniques is highly desirable. The CVD is a nurturing environment that focuses on training and supporting post-doctoral fellows in their path towards independence. Postdoctoral fellowships are initially for one year, but they may be renewed annually based on progress for up to a maximum of 5 years. 

Please send curriculum vitae, a brief outline of relevant research experience and interests and the names of three references via email to Marcelo B. Sztein M.D., Professor of Pediatrics; Associate Director for Basic and Translational Research, Chief, Cellular Immunology Section, CVD, and Director of the University of Maryland Flow Cytometry and Mass Cytometry Core Facility; at msztein@som.umaryland.edu. Further information about the CVD can be found at: http://medschool.umaryland.edu/CVD/. The UM is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.

Second Round of Pilot Grant Awardees Announced

The CCHI IOFM Core funded six applications submitted in response to our RFA released August 31, 2020. The CCHI Steering Committee sought applications from CCHI centers to capitalize on emerging opportunities and encourage multi-center, multi-disciplinary collaborations. The immediate objective of the CCHI is to support mechanistic and hypothesis-testing studies to understand human immunity applicable to the biodefense effort (i.e. innate, adaptive and mucosal immune responses to infection, vaccination and adjuvants). Studies on immune-mediated diseases (e.g. airway allergy, food allergy, autoimmunity, organ transplant rejection) are also of interest, as these data will provide a more comprehensive understanding of the human immune system.

Sean Brady, PhD from Rockefeller University applied from the Rockefeller University CCHI U19 Center (Ravetch, PD/PI).  Project is entitled “Human-microbial-lectins regulate the mucosal immune system”

Junyue Cao, PhD from Rockefeller University applied from the Rockefeller University CCHI U19 Center (Ravetch, PD/PI).  Project is entitled “Investigation of the pathogenesis of Psoriasis through a novel single-cell genomic technique”

Shirit Einav, MD from Stanford University applied from the Stanford University CCHI U19 Center (Davis, PD/PI).  Project is entitled “Unique human lung organoids to study COVID-19 pathogenesis and therapy response”

Marc K. Hellerstein, MD, PhD from the University of California, Berkeley applied from the Emory University CCHI U19 Center (Ahmed, PD/PI).  The project is entitled “Lifespan of SARS-CoV-2 reactive T-cells in COVID-19: Rationale for T-cell based vaccines”

William Hildebrand, PhD, MA from the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center applied from the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation CCHI U19 Center (Coggeshall, PD/PI).  The Core is entitled “HLA Typing Core”

Troy Randall, PhD from the University of Alabama at Birmingham applied from the UAB CCHI U19Center (Lund, PD/PI).  Project is entitled “Lung-resident memory B and T cells from COVID-19 convalescent patients”

First Round of Pilot Grant Awardees Announced

person holding petri dish with colorful content toward camera

The CCHI IOFM Core funded ten applications submitted in response to our RFA released August 26, 2019.  The CCHI Steering Committee sought applications from CCHI centers to capitalize on emerging opportunities and encourage multi-center, multi-disciplinary collaborations. The immediate objective of the CCHI is to support mechanistic and hypothesis-testing studies to understand human immunity applicable to the biodefense effort (i.e. innate, adaptive and mucosal immune responses to infection, vaccination and adjuvants). Studies on immune-mediated diseases (e.g. airway allergy, food allergy, autoimmunity, organ transplant rejection) are also of interest, as these data will provide a more comprehensive understanding of the human immune system.

Stephanie Boisson-Dupuis, PhD from Rockefeller University applied from the Rockefeller University CCHI U19 Center (Ravetch, PD/PI).  Project is entitled “Inherited human PD-1 deficiency”

Stylianos Bournazos, PhD from Rockefeller University applied from the Rockefeller University CCHI U19 Center (Ravetch, PD/PI).  Project is entitled “Modulating the antibody response to vaccination through targeting the CD40 axis”

Shirit Einav, MD from Stanford University applied from the Stanford University CCHI U19 Center (Davis, PD/PI).  Project is entitled “Deciphering the pathogenesis of severe dengue in natural infection in children via single-cell approaches”

William Hildebrand, PhD, MA from the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center applied from the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation CCHI U19 Center (Coggeshall, PD/PI).  The Core is entitled “HLA Typing Core”

Kate Jeffrey, PhD from Massachusetts General Hospital applied from the Massachusetts General Hospital/University of Pennsylvania CCHI U19 Center (Chung and Wherry, PD/PIs).  Project is entitled “Examination of the Epigenome in Single and Low Number Human Immune Cells”

Murali Krishna Kaja, PhD from Emory University applied from the Emory University CCHI U19 Center (Ahmed, PD/PI). Project is entitled “Characterizing dengue specific IgG subclass antibody responses and Fc glycosylation changes during primary and secondary dengue infections in India”

Rodney King, PhD from the University of Alabama at Birmingham applied from the University of Alabama at Birmingham CCHI U19 Center (Lund, PD/PI).  Project is entitled “The influence of isotype CH1 on antigen binding”

Holden Maecker, PhD from Stanford University applied from the Stanford University CCHI U19 Center (Davis, PD/PI).  Course is entitled “CyTOF Immune Monitoring Course”

Anoma Nellore, MD from the University of Alabama at Birmingham applied from the University of Alabama at Birmingham CCHI U19 Center (Lund, PD/PI).  Project is entitled “Characterization of Mucosal and Circulating HA-specific B cells after LAIV”

Catherine Wu, MD from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute applied from the Massachusetts General Hospital/University of Pennsylvania CCHI U19 Center (Chung and Wherry, PD/PIs).  Project is entitled “Tissue localization of virus-specific T cells by spatial sequencing technologies”

Fourth Cycle of Cooperative Centers on Human Immunology Funded

The Cooperative Centers on Human Immunology (CCHI) were awarded in response to RFA-AI-17-040 to support studies that will advance our understanding of the mechanisms regulating human immune response.  The CCHI U19 mechanism supports mechanistic and hypothesis-testing studies to understand human immunity applicable to the biodefense effort; i.e. innate, adaptive and mucosal immune responses to infection, vaccination and adjuvants. Studies on immune-mediated diseases (e.g. airway allergy, food allergy, autoimmunity, organ transplant rejection) are also of interest, as these data will provide a more comprehensive understanding of the human immune system.

The program supports the centralized infrastructure needed to promote and coordinate multi-disciplinary research in human immunology. Additional objectives are to promote public access to CCHI-supported data and metadata through public portals such as ImmPort, and develop new technologies to support human immunology research.

This current cycle represents the 4th cycle of funding for the U19 human immunology funding mechanism.  Several of our current CCHI center members are repeat awardees.  Emory University, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation and Stanford University have begun their 4th cycle of funding (since 2003-2004); Massachusetts General Hospital is on its 3rd cycle (since 2009); and Rockefeller University is beginning its 2nd cycle of funding (since 2014).  New to the group are Jackson Laboratory, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, and the University of Alabama at Birmingham, which is also hosting the Infrastructure and Opportunity Fund Management Core.