Natriuretic Peptides (NP) are hormones produced by the heart, and they have a wide range of favorable metabolic benefits. Lower levels of these hormones are associated with an increased likelihood of the development of diabetes and poor cardiometabolic health. Obese and Black individuals have ~30% lower levels of NP and are at a greater risk of developing cardiovascular (CV) events as compared to lean and White counterparts. Some people have common genetic variations that cause them to have ~20% lower NP levels. Similar to other low NP populations, these individuals with low NP genotype (i.e., carrying a common genetic variation called rs5068) are at a greater risk of developing cardiometabolic diseases. By understanding the NP response following the exercise challenge and the glucose challenge in individuals with genetically lower NP levels will help us understand how to improve cardiometabolic health in them.

To participate in the study, please email us at genesis@uabmc.edu .

Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV2) due to novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) related infection (COVID-19) is characterized by severe ventilation-perfusion mismatch leading to refractory hypoxemia. To date, there is no specific treatment available for 2019-nCoV. Nitric oxide is a selective pulmonary vasodilator gas used as rescue therapy in refractory hypoxemia due to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In-vitro and clinical evidence indicate that inhaled nitric oxide gas (iNO) has also antiviral activity against other strains of coronavirus. The primary aim of this study is to determine whether inhaled NO improves oxygenation in patients with hypoxic SARS-CoV2. This is a multicenter single-blinded randomized controlled trial with 1:1 individual allocation.

Black individuals are more likely to have decreased insulin sensitivity which results in a high risk for the development of cardiometabolic disease. The reasons for this are incompletely understood. Natriuretic peptides (NPs) are hormones produced by the heart that plays a role in regulating the metabolic health of an individual. The low circulating level of NPs is an important contributor to increased risk for diabetes. The NP levels are relatively lower among Black individuals thus affecting their metabolic health and putting them at a higher risk for diabetes. This study aims to test the hypothesis that by augmenting NP levels using sacubitril/valsartan, among Black Individuals one can improve their metabolic health (as measured by insulin sensitivity & energy expenditure) and help establish the role of NPs in the underlying mechanism behind increased risk for cardiometabolic disease in these population.

To participate in the study, please email us at  nauticalstudy@uabmc.edu.

The purpose of the study is to assess the diurnal rhythm in natriuretic peptide levels and its temporal relationship with nocturnal blood pressure in obese and African-American individuals as compared with lean and white individuals.

The purpose of the study is to understand the origins of differential response to beta-blockers in African-Americans and may provide insight regarding racial differences in cardiovascular risk.

To participate in the study, please email us at exercisebetastudy@uabmc.edu.

The purpose of the study is to discover any racial dissimilarity in the response of Natriuretic peptide (NP) system to acute metabolic influences such as a high carbohydrate challenge

Obese individuals have a higher prevalence of nocturnal hypertension and non-dipping blood pressure (BP) and are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) events and death as compared with lean individuals. The Natriuretic Peptides (NPs) are hormones produced by the heart which directly regulate BP by causing dilation of blood vessels and by removing sodium and water from the body. NPs have a 24-hour day-night rhythm and control the day-night rhythm of BP as well. The NP-BP rhythm relationship is broken down in obese individuals. Lower circulating levels of NPs, elevated renin hormone (a part of the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System [RAAS]) at nighttime may also contribute to the high nocturnal blood pressure in obese individuals and put them at a higher risk of developing CV events. This current study seeks to determine the biological implications of chronopharmacology for synchronizing NP-RAAS-based blood pressure therapy with the physiological diurnal rhythms to restore the normal diurnal rhythm of blood pressure in obese individuals.

To participate in the study, please email us at PRECISION_BPSTUDY@uabmc.edu

The UAB Cardiovascular Research Biobank (CARBON) will be a resource that contains biological materials, such as DNA samples, in addition to health and personal information on a large number of people over time. It will be set up so that it can be used in the future as a resource for researchers undertaking a wide range of medical research.

To participate in the study, please email us at carbonstudy@uabmc.edu